Dietitian Susie Burrell reveals low-calorie, low-cost vegetables to buy on a budget this winter

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Nutritionist reveals the CHEAPEST vegetables you should stock up on this winter to save at checkout – and they’ll help your belt too

  • A top nutritionist shared healthy and inexpensive vegetables to eat this winter
  • Dietitian Susie Burrell revealed her money-saving swaps to make in stores
  • She said cauliflower is an affordable alternative to broccoli which costs $10 a kilo
  • Carrots are a cheaper swap and are more nutritionally dense than zucchini
  • Fresh or frozen kale is only $4 a bunch and packed with vitamins and nutrients
  • Susie said to opt for the beet over the bell pepper and canned instead of the fresh tomato

With the price of fresh produce on the rise, a top Australian nutritionist has revealed which vegetables to add to your shopping list this winter, low in calories and cost.

Dietitian Susie Burrelwho has two majoring degrees in nutrition, dietetics and psychology, said there are many changes people can make if their favorite vegetables are beyond their budget.

She said instead of broccoli for $10 a kilo, cauliflower is a much cheaper and healthier substitution, while canned tomatoes can be tastier and more affordable than fresh varieties.

Sydney dietician Susie Burrell (pictured) has revealed which vegetables to add to your shopping list this winter that are low in calories and cost

Carrots cost just $1-2 a kilo, much more nutrient dense, and a versatile vegetable for all kinds of meals, Susie said.

“Carrots are high in antioxidants and can be made as snacks, mixed into soups or smoothies, or roasted compared to zucchini which are much lower in nutrients overall,” Susie says.

Cauliflower costs $4-5 each at most major supermarkets and has many of the same nutritional benefits as broccoli.

Susie’s Budget Vegetable Swaps

❌Instead of broccoli for $12 per kilo

✅Buy cauliflower at $4-$5 each

❌Instead of fresh tomatoes for $10 to $14 per kilo

✅Buy canned tomatoes for $1-2 a can

❌Instead of lettuce for $6 to $12 per head

✅Buy kale for $4-5 a bunch or $1-2 frozen

❌Instead of zucchini for $10 to $12 per kilo

✅Buy carrots for $1-2 per kilo

❌Instead of red pepper for $10 to $12 per kilo

✅Buy canned beets for $3 per kilo

“Broccoli is a superfood, packed with cancer-fighting molecules, vitamin C and fiber, but cauliflower is also half the price,” Susie told FEMAIL.

“Plus, cauliflower makes a low-carb alternative to rice that can easily be turned into a flavorful risotto.”

With fresh tomatoes costing between $10 and $14 a kilo, Susie said canned tomatoes for $1 to $2 a can were a perfect swap.

“Not only is it hard to find tasty fresh tomatoes, but canned tomatoes have been cooked, which means they offer lycopene, a nutrient known to be anti-cancer, especially for prostate cancer. “, she explained.

Susie recommended opting for fresh or frozen kale over lettuce.

“Kale is one of the most nutrient dense greens you can find with exceptionally high amounts of nutrients including vitamin C, beta-carotene and vitamin K making it a great addition smart everyday in smoothies, stir-fries or soups,” she said.

Carrots cost just $1-2 a kilo, much more nutrient dense, and a versatile vegetable for all kinds of meals, Susie said.

“Carrots are rich sources of the antioxidant beta-carotene and can be made as easy snacks, mixed into soups or smoothies, or roasted into crisps compared to zucchini which are much lower in nutrients overall,” she said. declared.

While red bell pepper is rich in vitamin C, Susie said the price and quality are “highly variable”.

“Beets, on the other hand, are equally nutritious and have been specifically shown to have a positive effect on blood pressure, making beet juices and smoothies a smart choice for people with high blood pressure. “, she said.

Recipe: Parmesan and Herb Crusted Carrot Chips

Ingredients

3 large carrots

1/4 cup grated parmesan

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon dried oregano

Tzatziki to serve

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 200°C and line a baking sheet with parchment paper

2. Cut each carrot into 16 long pieces

3. In a large bowl, combine the carrot chips, Parmesan cheese, oil, garlic and oregano and toss to coat the chips in the seasonings

4. Arrange the coated fries on the baking sheet leaving a space between each fries

5. Bake for 15-20 minutes and serve with tzatziki dip

Source: dietician susieburrell/Instagram

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